About the Sydney Saké Society...

 We're passionate about Japan's national brew!

 

We love curating unique & enticing events that showcase the very best Japanese saké, spirits & beer and other goods & services related to Japan's national brew. We are passionate about creating an active & responsible community of saké lovers right here in the best city in the world - Sydney!

About Saké

First: it's pronounced "sa-keh", not "sa-ki".

Next: read on for a brief description of the creative brewing process

By Simon-sake (photo taken by User:Simon-sake - www.sake.nl) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

Saké Ingredients

Saké is fermented from rice, but the rice used is different from rice eaten at the table. Saké rice grains are larger, with a starchy white core that is key to the fermentation process. The rice is milled to expose this core, and the eventual saké quality depends on how much of this core is exposed.

Just as important is the water used in the brewing process, as well as the mold and yeast added to the potent brew. The combination of the minerals in the water, and the mold and yeast variety can produce unpredictable and wonderful results.

Brewing Saké

A time-consuming and multi-step process, brewing the saké is carefully controlled.

 

First, rice is polished, washed and then left to absorbed the water. Then it is steamed, to which the precious mold is added and incubated over time, before yeast and water is added to form koji. Additional batches of rice are added over time to form a mash called moromi. Once this has completely fermented, it is pressed and filtered to produce saké. This saké is allowed to mature before finally being bottled.

By The Epopt (Transfered from en.wikipedia.org) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Serving Saké

The "warm" vs "cold" debate. Some say that heat causes flavours to degrade, so high-quality saké tend to be served cold. However, it still comes down to preference, so you can enjoy most saké at a variety of temperatures, from very warm (atsu-kan) to chilled (reishu).

 

Traditionally, saké is served in small cups (ochoko) from ceramic flasks (tokkuri). You may also see small wooden boxes (masu) being used as well. But any way you choose to drink your saké is a perfectly acceptable way!


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